Top 5 steps for your Crisis Communications Readiness

27/05/2020By scandinaviancomChange Communications, Christina Rytter, Crisis Communications, Management Communications, PR

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Crisis Communications Advisor

As I’m sure everyone has seen by now a crisis can happen at any time – and when you least expect it. Therefore every organization should be ready to manage every possible crisis. From my 20 years as Crisis Communications Advisor, I have learned that successful handling of a crisis is 70 percent preparation and 30 percent execution.

To best handle the first part of the equation, here are my Top 5 Steps that you need to take right now if you have not done so already:

1. Identify potential scenarios for crises. 

Study what has happened to other companies, both inside and outside your industry. Then, ask key people in your organization to identify the most vulnerable areas or processes. In this process you also should analyze your company’s state of readiness by asking these types of questions; Do we have a crisis plan? Is it up to date and relevant, or is it just boilerplate? Who are in our PR crisis-management team? (Read more about PR crisis-management team in my article posted just before this one). 

2. Check the readiness of your PR crisis-management team. 

Do they know their potential roles? Are they familiar with the company’s crisis response resources, policies and procedures? Are your key leaders and other spokespersons comfortable and effective in front of the media? Do they have experience in crisis situations or crisis simulations?

3. Research records & review Social Media status 

Take a research of your company’s record. What previous crises has it faced and what were the outcomes? Such information always comes out in a crisis, so you need to be ready to deal with those issues when this happens. Also, review your social media status. Consider the following: Do you have the tools and people in place to monitor LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, etc.? Can you respond quickly to misinformation, accusations and distortions? Is your management aware of the impact and can respond to these media?

4. Build key leader image & strengthen key relations

It’s a cleaver crisis readiness strategy to work with PR and build a positive image of key leaders. Any company in a crisis starts with an advantage if people know and respect both the company and its leaders. The CEO and other top management should appear occasionally in business media and at “good-news events”. Also, examine and strengthen key relationships. This includes local and national media, government officials, employees, people in potentially affected communities and other stakeholders and influencers your company might have.

5. Schedule training & simulations. 

Set-up media- and messages training sessions with key leaders and other spokespersons. Anyone who could end up in the spotlight should know the essentials of successful media interviews. Those who have not participated in media training should consider a session at the earliest opportunity. Those who have not recently participated in media training should take a refresher training.

It is also highly effective for your crisis readiness to stage crisis simulations. These programs are beneficial in many ways beyond just producing a higher state of readiness. They help discover flaws in current crisis plans, identify leadership qualities and raise everyone’s awareness.

Learn more about Crisis Communications

How to build a PR crisis-management team

18/04/2020By scandinaviancomChange Communications, Christina Rytter, Crisis Communications, Management Communications, PR, Strategic Communications

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Crisis Communications Advisor

When a crisis hits you need to have a team of key people in place, so you can respond quickly and effectively before the situation escalates. So, let’s look at whom you need on your team – and how the team should operate.

The Crisis Communicator

This is the person on your team with the experience and expertise to plan and execute the right communications response in any kind of PR crisis or internal crisis. Ideally, this person will also exude a calming influence on the team, while knowing how to manage the crisis response narrative. If you don’t have an internal Crisis Communicator this role can also be managed by The Crisis Advisor.

The Key Leader

When a major PR crisis hits, it’s inevitable that the CEO will be involved in some way, whether you are making key decisions, delivering a message, or as a spokesperson providing a face for the company’s crisis response. But who else on your team can pivot from their day-to-day work and take on a key decision-making role in the crisis response? Ideally, you will have at least two or three of these key leaders.

You need someone who is an accomplished communicator and a clear thinker to help the crisis communicator and the CEO formulates a response. This person will have a proven track record for making smart decisions with limited information on short timetables. You will also need someone to manage the internal crisis response. Someone who has the authority to control and monitor what your team says and to whom, who can also be a calming influence as they deliver messages from the decision-makers to rest of the team.

Every Key Leader who acts as company spokesperson can also always secure a higher success rate by participating in Media- and Message Training – especially in a crisis. This will also secure the alignment of the company key messages in the crisis-management team

The Media Manager

At some point in your crisis response, you will need a person whose sole duty is to manage media interest. From moderating social media to responding to media requests and connecting the right messages with the right people, this can be a full-time job in the middle of a crisis.

The Crisis Advisor

When you’re very close to a situation, you can miss details or make assumptions that diminish the effectiveness of your crisis response. That’s why it makes good sense to bring in an outside advisor who specializes in crisis communication. This person or team has a different perspective that can prove invaluable in formulating and executing a crisis response.

To get your own Crisis Advisor as CEO also means that someone fully has your back – and that the advisor will work with you and your in-house team to build a narrative and implement a crisis response that should minimize the damage to your brand reputation and put your company in a better position to begin rebuilding credibility.

When facing a PR crisis your Crisis Communications Advisor also has an extensive list of key media contacts with whom they have developed good working relationships. When speed really matters and you need positive earned media, knowing exactly whom to call is a vital aspect of an effective external crisis response.

Learn more about Crisis Communications

How to handle your Corona Crisis Communications in Scandinavia?

13/03/2020By scandinaviancomChange Communications, Christina Rytter, Crisis Communications, Management Communications, PR, Scandinavian Communications, Social Media, Strategic Communications

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Crisis Communications Advisor

The Scandinavian countries have not been spared the coronavirus pandemic. As of this Friday morning Denmark reports 674 cases of the coronavirus. Norway reports 734 cases and the first fatality. Both countries now shut down schools and universities for the coming two weeks. Denmark furthermore encouraged companies to let people work from home – and bars, restaurant and clubs to stay closed. Danish indoor events with +100 participants are banned.

Sweden reports 667 cases of coronavirus as of today with every region in the country affected and had the first fatality linked to the virus in Scandinavia. Sweden now bans large public events for +500 people. Finland does the same with today’s reported number of 59 cases of the coronavirus.

The time is now

You need to take charge of your communications before rumours, panic, fear or anger does. Most humans don’t like sudden change – and they will fill in the blanks of missing information with their own interpretation of, what might happen next. Everyone carries their personal backstory and life experience, that will be the starting point to fill in the blanks if their leader doesn’t. Often peoples own guess of what happens next in crisis and change is their worst-case scenario – driven by strong emotions like fear or anger. Starting rumours or impulsive negative reactions.

Therefore, a quick response is key in a critical situation, because it gives you the chance to handle and control the communications around the situation and thereby the outcome proactively with a higher possibility for success. BUT the quick response must be flanked by carefully thought out communications – especially what key messages you need to deliver in the conversation with your different stakeholders.

Create order in your own house first

As a first step, you need to prepare for information and conversation. And as with the situation of the coronavirus in every case that has or can have an effect on your employees it is vital to create order in your own house first. Clear internal communications must be your first step. Over the years I have seen many examples of how a crisis or change suddenly turned MUCH worth do to internal rumours and unforeseen actions from employees driven by fear or anger because management and boards were too busy focusing on external communications as their first step. To let employees, learn about for example their potential job loss for the first time via the news, is not the way to do it! Always unintended of cause, but still this can happen if you don’t start with and steer internal communications quite firm in a crisis and change.

Get ready for Corona conversation

In your crisis communication around the coronavirus, the most effective way is to draw up and work with different realistic crisis or change scenarios and plan, what to do and say in each imaginary scenario – and which communications channels will suit your messages and conversations with different internal and external stakeholders best.

Scandinavians are very critical and direct – and we don’t hold back with the questions. This apply to both employees, journalists, clients, business partners and competitors. So, you really need to prepare.

Create your Q&A:

  • What is your overall intention with this information?
  • What is your key message? Your communication is clearer, when you only focus on one or few key messages.
  • Who are you talking to? (Your key target group/stakeholders)
  • Which information do the person/stakeholders need?
  • Which situation are they in? Communicate the messages relevant to them, not to you.
  • Choose your role based on the person/target group. Are you formal or informal? How do you dress? What language and body language do you use? BUT be yourself!
  • Prepare, prepare and prepare. Train, train and train.


Take the opportunity to show your values

In a crisis case like the coronavirus pandemic, suddenly we as companies as well as humans get a higher common purpose to stick together and help each other. It must be people before profit. So as a company or organization, you need to find out how you can do your best – and at the same time, it is an opportunity to show the world your values and corporate social responsibility.

Corona Communications Kudos and Fail of the week

A great positive example that deserves Corona Communication Kudos from Denmark this week is a joint press release from leading retail companies AND competitors Coop, Salling Group, Dagrofa and Rema 1000. The release informs Danes that there will be plenty of convenience goods in the stores in the coming weeks. In this way taking proactive social responsibility to secure that people are not stockpiling food driven by fear and uncertainty. In this way, the companies as suppliers and industry experts fill in the Danes communications blanks with clear and trustworthy information to create security. At the same time show their corporate values and leave us as consumers with positive feelings and stronger awareness around their brands. Even a feeling of pride that we have such companies in Denmark.

The Corona Communications Fail of the week I must assign to Airbnb that refuses scores of refunds if you cancel your trip. This is also a way of communication the company values very clear. But I’m sure in the light of the coronavirus setting profit over people at this time, is very shortsighted and will damage the brand and not been taken lightly by the clients. The stakes are even higher for Airbnb, because this is the company wants to debut on the stock market – so their reputation has never mattered more.

Remember all in all in crisis and change when your response quickly and are well prepared, you can turn the difficult situation into an opportunity to show authentic positive values – if you have them 😉. By working out a carefully thought out message platform with key messages as a first step. And train through the different scenarios with message- and media training, you can navigate successfully through. Get your Corona Crisis Communications Action Plan in order; Whom do you need to communicate to as a first step? When and how? If you handle crisis and change like this, people will understand you much better – and even get on your side. When you keep calm and friendly – and communicate in a clear and authentic way you be at the forefront of things. And as always, the most important thing is to prepare – and train, train, train!

Get free advice for your Corona Crisis Communications

Don’t hesitate to contact directly if you need help. We offer a free 20-min call with personal advice for your Corona Crisis Communications – book at the webpage formula.

Book your free call and learn more about Crisis Communications

5 tips to PR success in Scandinavian media

02/03/2020By scandinaviancomChristina Rytter, PR, PR Tips & Trends, Scandinavian Communications

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Trusted Communications Advisor

If you like to create better PR coverage in Scandinavia these focus points are key, when you work with media in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland: 

1. Write a real journalistic story

Think through and create a real journalistic story from scratch for the Scandinavian markets – and then get your corporate or product messages to fit with a downplayed balance. Always work with a journalistic approach in your PR Press kit for Scandinavian media. A Marketing approach towards Scandinavian Tier 1 media is a sure dead end – and your press release will easily end up in the garbage can at the newsdesk.


2. Take a local approach 

Write a local angled story for each Scandinavian market. Your PR core story for Scandinavia can be the same – but to really get it right, you then need to work out a local PR angle for each market; Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, etc. Understanding and acting on the small cultural differences between each Scandinavian market give you much greater PR results.

Work out a tailored media list for each Scandinavian country with a key journalist from Tier 1 media depending on your target group. Pick a broader range of media to get more volume, when you send out your press release – Scandinavia has a very narrow media structure with only a few media in each category.


3. Offer exclusivity 

Work with exclusive sell-in of your press release / PR story. This means that you only talk in person with one leading key media at the time. It’s key for most Scandinavian journalists to get their own stories with a unique angle. When you succeed with your PR sell-in. Wait for the agreed publication – and then go for a wide distribution of the press release to create a 2-waved PR effect. This can be very efficient!

Take into your planning that different Scandinavian media work with very different timing. If you go for a business daily, you might only need to approach the editor a couple of weeks before you like to see some media coverage. But if it’s a high-end lifestyle Magazine on print, you might need to talk to the editor 3-4 months ahead.


4. Except that the media decide the content 

Don’t expect to get any control over the final journalistic content in articles. Scandinavian journalists and media are very Independent – it’s just part of their DNA and our Scandinavian culture. You can approve your own quotes – and offer journalists a quality check of facts. Nothing more. Otherwise, you could offend the journalist. This independence also means that your PR adviser rarely is present at face-to-face interviews with the Scandinavian journalist.

Offer Media professional PR photos to strengthen the possibility of media coverage. This could be PR headshots of your company spokesperson or of your Product/Services. This must preferably be PR photos take for media in a journalistic context supporting the journalistic angle of your story – NOT traditional marketing photos.


5. Follow-up in person

Follow up on journalists in person on phone and email to secure the sell-in of the story and final media coverage. In Scandinavia, this is a very delicate balance between being proactive without being annoying for journalists, who have a very busy and tight work schedule and a lot of people approaching them every day.

5-Star MarCom Strategy 2020

15/02/2020By scandinaviancomChristina Rytter, Management Communications, Scandinavian Communications, Strategic Communications

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Trusted Communications Advisor

Ready to reach the stars in 2020? If so, working strategically with Marketing and Communications is a pivotal first step in the right direction. Here you’ll get my recommendations for a 5-Star MarCom Strategy 2020

Business goals as guiding star
Communications, PR and Marketing is all about supporting your overall business goals. Therefor all activities must drive the business forward according to the overall company business goals. MarCom Strategy today is a natural integrated part of the business strategy in many leading companies. Your overall MarCom strategy must link together with a Go-to-Market plan for tactical execution of your campaigns and activities within communications, PR, marketing and social media.

Key Messages in order
It is absolutely key to have your Key Messages in order. Do a solid piece of work with both your Corporate & Product Messages. Our Corporate messages must be Value driven, authentic and show WHY your company or organisation are in this world? What lights your inner fire? This is feeling based messages. All studies show that our actions as humans to a large extend is feeling driven. It’s hardwired biology. Your Product messages must address your target groups pains, needs and dreams. You need to understand and take your target groups perspective to create relevant product messages. NOT only your own company perspective! 😉

Segment Target Groups
A vital part of your MarCom Strategy is to segment your target groups and influencers. Successful Communications, PR and Marketing start with a very clear and deep segmentation. Your target groups are often very different. The more we unfold the target groups and influencers in our strategic work, the clearer it becomes, that we have many more, than we realize off the top of our heads. A typical pitfall is therefore, that companies try to reach all target groups with the same type of communications. If you try to reach everyone – often you reach no one. And the MarCom results become to weak to create a real successful impact on the business.

Relevant Communication Channels
To reach each of your key target groups, you need to tailor your content and then communicate and get into dialog in the relevant and strategic/tactical selected communications channels. This is NOT necessarily the channels you know and use yourself! 😉 But the channels preferred by each of your target group and influencers. Again, this often very in different target groups across business position, country, age, gender etc . Your business needs to be present, engage and communicate in the channels where your target groups are.

Measure Results
You need to strategic decide on and set KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) for your communications, PR and marketing. Otherwise you can only to a lesser extent measure the effect, business value and ROI (Return-on-Investment) of your invested MarCom budget.

When you set KPIs and thereby measure results, you’ll be able to have clear evaluation of, what is driving the business forward. And what is not. Also, you can demonstrate the direct business value of communications, PR, marketing and social media to the management and the board.


Learn more:

Please contact Christina Rytter direct on mail cr@scandcomm.com or phone +4523967733 to learn more about, how we create a tailored 5-Star MarCom Strategy 2020 for your company or organization in Scandinavia – and beyond.

Read more about Strategic Communications

Scandinavian Communications wins Global Business Award

15/01/2020By scandinaviancomChange Communications, Christina Rytter, Content Marketing, Crisis Communications, Management Communications, PR, Public Relations Global Network, Scandinavian Communications, Social Media, Strategic Communications

Just arrived from Chile – 1st Place The PRGN Business Power Awards! We are very thankful for The Public Relations Global Network recognizing our work in Scandinavia this year 🙏

If you also like to leverage your business in Scandinavia, don’t hesitate to contact our CEO Christina Rytter at email: cr@scandcomm.com or mobile +4523967733. We are here to help.

Top 5 tips for Crisis Communications in Scandinavia

21/12/2019By scandinaviancomChange Communications, Christina Rytter, Crisis Communications, Management Communications, PR Tips & Trends, Scandinavian Communications, Social Media, SoMe Tips & Trends, Strategic Communications

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Crisis Communications Advisor

When crisis or change hits like a bolt from the blue it’s normal for even the most experienced executive to feel concerned. Especially when you want to be at the forefront of things. Here are my Top 5 tips on how you navigate successfully through the storm when a crisis or change hits you in the Scandinavian market:

1. Response quick – but well thought out

A quick response is key in a critical situation, because it gives you the chance to handle and control the situation and thereby the outcome proactively with a higher possibility for success. BUT the quick response must be flanked by carefully thought out communications – especially what key messages you need to deliver in the conversation with your different stakeholders.

Scandinavians are very critical and direct – and we don’t hold back with the questions. This apply to both employees, journalists, clients, business partners and competitors. So, you really need to prepare. I find that one of the most effective ways in crisis and change communications in Scandinavia is to draw up and work with different realistic crisis or change scenarios and plan, what to do and say in each imaginary scenario – and which communications channels will suit your messages and conversations with different internal and external stakeholders best.    

2. Get ready for conversation

  • What is your key message? Your communication is clearer, when you only focus on one or few key messages.
  • Who are you talking to? (Your key target group/stakeholders)
  • Which information do the person/stakeholders need?
  • Which situation are they in? Communicate the messages relevant to them, not to you.  
  • Choose your role based on the person/target group. Are you formal or informal? How do you dress? What language and body language do you use? BUT be yourself!
  • Prepare, prepare and prepare.
  • Train, train and train.

3. Take control over your body language

Your body language is your greatest asset, when you know how to control and use it. When you learn to use your body language proactively combined with clear messages, you can be a brilliant and authentic leader and communicator. BUT if you don’t have your body language under control – and that is quite normal in a crisis or change situation, when you might get nervous – then it can work so much against you, that nobody hears what you say. Well-known international studies show, that up to 80 % of people’s perception of you will be from your body language. That is if you fail to control it. Otherwise people listen. Scandinavian will mostly listen – if it’s not to boring. And if you serve beer (or something stronger for the Finns) they will really listen. 😉.    

Control what we see:

  • Posture: Straight back and raised head express security, authority and energy.
  • Choose a suitable grimace for the occasion; Seriousness, enthusiasm or joy?
  • Use gestures that support the message.
  • Firm eye contact exudes security and credibility.
  • If you avoid eye contact it signals insecurity, uncertainty – and thus untrustworthiness.
  • Pay attention to your bad habits and patterns – they especially come out when you are nervous under pressure.
  • Look fresh and well-rested (of cause sometimes that might be a little difficult in a crisis).

Control what we hear:

  • Deep and calm voicing creates trust and credibility.
  • Variation in voice creates dynamism and awareness of the recipient.
  • Talk slowly – without getting boring. It exudes heaviness and credibility.
  • Breath deep and use (rhetorical) pauses.

4. Keep calm
Even the most experienced executive can get nervous under pressure in a difficult crisis or change situation. That is just human nature.

What happens when you get nervous?

  • You protect your body with your arms, turn your back, avoid eye contact, smile stiffly and stave off.
  • You sweat, get pale, get ticks, mess with your hair or perform other unconscious bad habits. What are your bad habits under pressure?
  • You move uneasily; rocks or turns on the chair. Tilting back and forth on your feet.
  • You breathe quickly and superficially.
  • You speak faster and get a sharper and lighter voice.

Then what to do?

  • Breathe deeply and plant both feet into the floor.  
  • Lower your talk rate and use (rhetorical) pauses.
  • Open your arms, straighten your back and look up and out.
  • Make and maintain eye contact – possibly look between the eyes if real eye contact is unpleasant.
  • Only smile when it suits the occasion.
  • Sit and stand still.
  • Choose a chair that stands firm. Otherwise you will quite easy start rocking or turn it.
  • If at a presentation: Go consciously among the audience.
  • Avoid carbonated water – so you don’t burp (when you breathe quick and superficially).  

5. Use the crisis to your advantage

When your response quickly and are well prepared, you can turn the difficult situation into your advantage. By working out a carefully thought out message platform with key messages as a first step. And train through the different scenarios with message- and media training, you can navigate successfully through. Get your Crisis Communications Action Plan in order; Who do you need to communicate to as a first step? When and how? If you handle crisis and change like this, people will understand you much better – and even get on your side. When you keep calm and friendly – and communicate in a clear and authentic way you be at the forefront of things. And as always, the most important thing is to prepare – and train, train, train!

Get free crisis advise and learn more about Crisis Communications

Need help with Crisis Communications in Scandinavia?

8 Tips to improve your Instagram marketing

08/12/2019By scandinaviancomContent Marketing, Scandinavian Communications, Social Media, SoMe Tips & Trends

By Christina Rytter, Founder & Trusted Communications Advisor

Instagram as B2B social media is growing at a rapid speed in all Scandinavian markets and the platform has some quite strong business solutions to support your brand building and direct lead generation to support sales. Get my Top 8 tips on how to improve your marketing effort on Instagram:

1. Understand your audience
You gotta understand your Scandinavian audience.  That’s key to success on Instagram. Scandinavians from Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland are similar – but not the same!

2. Talk with them, not at them
Ask you Scandinavian audience questions. Always give a quick answer to questions and clearly communicate what you do. That’s a big key on Instagram.  

3. Use relevant hashtags
Hashtags are Instagram’s signposts. Use relevant hashtags, but not too many so it doesn’t look messy and get confusing for your audience. Analyse and test your hashtags, to find out which ones create the best impact for you and your company. Remember to brand your hashtags.

4. Know when to post
It’s vital for the amount of engagement on your Instagram posts, that you post at the right time. Instagram engagement peaks mid-day and mid-week, similar to the other major social networks. Wednesday at 11 a.m. is the overall best day to post to Instagram – followed by Friday at 10-11 a.m. The most consistent engagement is from Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday; go enjoy your day off – few will read your posts anyway 😉. Different industries also can peak a bit more on different times.


5. Create beautiful visuals
Instagram is a very visual platform. So to make it work to your advantage, you need to give your posts a distinctive look with tailored appeal to your Scandinavian target groups. Our vision trumps all other senses. Research has shown that when people hear information, they’re likely to remember only 10% of that information three days later. However, if a relevant image is paired with that same information, people retained 65% of the information three days later. Visual branding plays a huge role in not only attracting your clients and stakeholders – but also in making you and your company memorable and creating a positive perception in the minds of your key audience.

6. Add Calls-to-action
When you add Calls-to-action in your posts you get more direct pay-off on your work and have concrete KPIs to measure. When you create an Instagram Business Profile you get the possibility to ad different buttons on your profile besides of working with direct links in your Bio. Use emojis like arrows, hand pointing or the star to direct you audience towards the link. Also, it works well to insert a call-to-action text in your visuals directing people into what they should do next. You can ask them to buy your product, visit your website or get in touch with you.

The key is to be creative, so people take action. Test new versions to see which one engages your audience the most.


7. Tell Stories
On Instagram the best brand storytelling involves telling snackable, visual micro-stories that tie into your brand’s values and purpose. On Instagram it’s the people and the brands who tell the most interesting stories that build the massive audiences. When you use Instagram for a personal account develop a strong brand presence that shows, what you are passionate about in life.


8. Work with influencers
Adding Instagram influencer marketing into your overall SoMe-strategy can help to increase your brand awareness, grow your followers and thereby drive new leads and sales. Influencer marketing can be quite effective. It removes the barriers of traditional advertising when customers are introduced to your brand from a trusted source. When an influencer recommends your product or service on their channels, it comes across as a trusted recommendation from a friend. Therefore, it can have a huge impact on your brand awareness and sales support.

5 Trends Influencing the State of Public Relations

15/11/2019By scandinaviancomPR, PR Tips & Trends, Public Relations Global Network, Strategic Communications

By Aaron Blank, President of PRGN & CEO of The Fearey Group

Public relations is thriving – and evolving in exciting ways. It’s a great time to be in the business.

At its core, our work is unchanging: actively pursuing relationships – shaping them, building them and maintaining them. That will always be front and center. But other aspects of our profession are developing or expanding.

Here are the trends I’m watching:

1. Demand for data. The push to link PR to overall business objectives continues, pushing us to develop more and more meaningful metrics to measure PR performance and impact on operations. Measurement has always been a challenge for PR practitioners, but it’s finally getting easier. Now we can measure article clicks, sentiment and tone much more easily. For example, we can automatically measure links back to websites to show how our work drives traffic or supports lead generation.

2. Application of search. Search now plays a critical role in forming PR campaigns. We can use SEO keywords to discover trends, identify potential news items and understand the questions, issues, products and service people are looking for. This makes it faster and easier to target our work to consumer insights.

3. Optimized press releases. People have been saying that the press release is dead for years. And the truth is, the old version of the release is. Gone are the days when we wrote a release and expected the media to pick it up. Today’s optimized press release is content – content that enables us to tell our own story and manage our message. Still a great way to update reporters on organizational news, modern releases posted on our own sites support organic and paid search, and create opportunities to link back to additional content in our ecosystem. We can use them as catalysts for identifying issues or events to leverage and serve as the foundational content for larger campaigns involving earned, owned and paid media.

4. Investment in AI. It’s fun to see how artificial intelligence (AI) is starting to play a role in the industry. For instance, a new tool called SignalAI uses AI to make it easier to track numerous companies, people, events, trends – and analyze that information to support decision-making and inform campaigns. And new AI transcription services such as REV make speech-to-text faster and cheaper – some are even tailored to specialized industry sectors like healthcare or engineering. These tools enhance our skill sets and enable us to deliver better service to our clients so our teams can focus on more strategic pursuits.

5. Continued value of writing. No matter what, at the end of the day, we all have to write. Whether it’s a tweet, an email, a public statement or back-end website items that influence a reputation, we have to continue to perfect the editorial process. It’s vital.
PR has never been more valuable and more relevant. Responding to these trends empowers us to continue to produce high-quality work that shapes debates, changes behaviors and supports business operations. Investing in building entrusting relationships will always be the best marketing tactic of them all.

The Feaery Group is our partner agency in Seattle, USA.  Article originally published at PRGN.com

Visit from our Singapore partners

06/10/2019By scandinaviancomChristina Rytter, PR, Public Relations Global Network, Scandinavian Communications

This weekend our CEO had an exciting meeting and Lunch in Copenhagen with our Public Relations Global Network (PRGN) partners and friends from Mileage Communications in Singapore and New Delhi, India

The World’s Local Agency
PRGN is The World’s Local Public Relations Agency. We are a connected network of 50 hand-selected agencies working within PR, Strategic Communications and Digital/Social Marketing servicing key markets around the world. As leaders in our respective regions, PRGN agencies offer the “boots-on-the-ground” savvy of a local Public Relations agency, yet on a global scale. Our model allows us to deliver a unique level of flexibility – scaling up or down across multiple markets to meet your business needs. Each PR agency knows its local community and it knows how to help clients connect with their audiences in those regions.

Don’t hesitate to contact us if you need help in Scandinavia – or beyond with single-point-of-contact.

Read more about PRGN.